Current & Future Moms

Tracie and Zion, Chollas View

As a Black woman expecting, or currently with a baby, you deserve the best care possible. Despite the same levels of education, insurance coverage, and preventive care, Black women are three times more likely than White women to die during pregnancy and their babies are 60 percent more likely to be born premature. This is due to racial bias.

This is not acceptable. Black moms deserve high quality, respectful, equal care before, during, and after pregnancy. It is not fair that Black moms can do all the “right” things and still have poor birth outcomes. Until we eliminate systemic racism in health care, these inequities will continue. Start by taking steps to know your rights and ensure a healthy birth experience to protect tomorrow’s Black Legacy.

3x

California’s Black mothers are over 3x more likely to die due to pregnancy or delivery complications than White mothers.

i

Data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Vital Statistics, Underlying Cause of Death 1999-2018 and Natality public-use data 2007-2018, on CDC WONDER Online Database. Accessed at http://wonder.cdc.gov on Jun 9, 2020.

60%

Black infants in San Diego are nearly 60% more likely to be born premature and nearly 2 times more likely to be born with low birthweight than White infants.

i

Data from State of California, Department of Public Health, Center for Health Statistics and Informatics, California Comprehensive Birth Files.  Statistics prepared by County of San Diego, Health and Human Services Agency, Public Health Services, Maternal, Child and Family Health Services (www.sdmcfhs.org).

81%

African-American women are less likely than White women to receive prenatal care starting in the first trimester – 81.0% compared to 90.2%.

i

Birth data from 2016-2018. County of San Diego, Health and Human Services Agency, Public Health Services, Maternal, Child, and Family Health Services (www.sdmcfhs.org)

These disparities persist irrespective of factors such as the mother’s income or education.

i

Data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Vital Statistics, Underlying Cause of Death 1999-2018 and Natality public-use data 2007-2018, on CDC WONDER Online Database. Accessed at http://wonder.cdc.gov on Jun 9, 2020.

Ashley, Central City East

You have a human right to respectful, safe, and quality care during your pregnancy and birthing experience. What does this mean?

You have a right to…

  • Respect, dignity, and nondiscrimination throughout your care
  • Education, information about your pregnancy, childbirth, and decisions made throughout your care
  • Ask questions, participate in decisions, and provide informed consent for anything related to your well-being and that of your child
  • Quality, respectful care that honors your choices, preferences, preferred language, culture, religion, or traditions
  • Personal support before, during, and after your pregnancy and childbirth

Know Your Rights

The following are some resources from the March of Dimes and other sources related to taking care of yourself and planning for your family’s baby. Many links include videos and infographics for more information. Be sure to also review our Know Your Rights document to be aware of the best types of care and treatment during your pregnancy and birth.

Submit a Complaint:

Research shows that Black moms face clear, race-based inequalities, particularly when there are gaps in health insurance. If you received poor treatment during your pregnancy or childbirth experience, it is important you let your health plan know. You’ll find resources to respond, regardless of your insurance status. Below is information to make a complaint, based on your health insurance plan.

Blue California/Blue Shield of California Promise
Sharp Health Plan
California Department of Health Care Services Medi-Cal Member and Provider Helpline
MediCal Managed Care Plans in San Diego County

“I almost died after giving birth to my daughter, Olympia. Yet I consider myself fortunate…”

Serena Williams, What My Life-threatening Experience Taught Me About Giving Birth